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CSPAN2 7
CNNW 3
LINKTV 2
CSPAN 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 2:00pm EST
that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the waters." this is a paperback version. you won a pulitzer prize for this. how many hardback copies did you sell and how many of these paperbacks up to today? >> guest: i would have to talk to my publisher. only be a rough estimate of 100,000 heart attacks and 200 or maybe 300,000 paperbacks which it is peanuts for stephen king for a big six history book based on a subject that might make some people uncomfortable, but other people for me at least it's a great leveling transformation to hear. there's a lot of black heroes and white heroes. it's a cross-cultural drama. c-span: your credit -- i think it is an outfit called lyndhurst of chattanooga -- and the macarthur of chicago and the ford foundation as places that have given you money over the years; is the right? >> guest: yes. after "parting the waters" came out, because this book has taken nine years. the ford foundation gave me my first and only a research grant that i used to hire somebody for tw
PBS
Jan 19, 2013 12:00am PST
the memory of dr. martin luther king jr. this weekend, we cap off the 10th anniversary week by revisiting our conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could
Current
Jan 21, 2013 5:00pm PST
speech while in office the nation celebrates dr. martin luther king jr. and he carried a mantle for a broader progressism including his support of labor unions, social justice trying to eliminate poverty and his vocal anti-militarism. here is dr. king in a sermon where he points to our government for getting involved in the conflict there. >> a nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death. >> john: not a quote you hear too often on dr. king day. here to discuss this with me now is kristal brent zook, associate professor at director of the ma journalism program in hofstra university, she is also the author of three books including "black women's lives: stories of power and pain." and political activist and director of the peace and justice resource center, tom hayden. thank you for your time this evening. when this day was approaching i told the staff on the show i really wanted to do a dr. king discussion about these very topics because martin luther king jr. stood for civil rights,
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 9:00pm EST
might say was bittersweet to me because i knew dr. king, i knew him the last two years of his life and i am bitter because of the way that he was taken from us because of hatred in this country. i guess we can start at the beginning because the beginning of the but you were on the mall with dr. king and near the end you are near the mall again 50 years later with a monument that you helped design. >> guest: in between coming back so many times on different occasions to the mall, so it seems like a i lived in washington a short time that had a symbolic meaning for my life and sentimental. every time i come back i have all these memories. >> host: it's a beautiful city. you were 19-years-old in 1963. you were on the mall. the march on washington where dr. king gave that iconic address, i have a dream. how did you happen to go there? >> guest: part of it is i grew up in a small town where there weren't many black people. i think there were three black families growing up in los alamos. so i'd always been fascinated by what was the black community like? i didn't have very much exposure to it
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 12:00am EST
your life and cover new insights as a historian from the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr.. what prompted you? >> guest: it is the 50th anniversary and it is 50 years of mine life of the king legacy and to my coming of age. part of it was to do the to tasks. that my life had been connected to the keying legacy -- king legacy and how king impacted me and i was involved with this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> host: it is an excellent reid and we are of the same generation and i was also coming of age. it was bittersweet because i knew dr. king he was my mentor. but bitter because the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred. we can start at the beginning the kids you're on the mall with dr. king and at the end you were there again with 50 years later with the monument you help to design. >> guest: and coming back for important occasions. i only lived in washington a short time but the mall had a great symbolic meaning and sentimental. >> host: it is a beautiful city. 19 years ago, the march on washington where he gave the speech i have a dream. how di
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 10:00pm EST
as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write about the martin luther king anniversary and 50 years of my life that came to light and his legacy and life coincides with my coming-of-age. so part of it was to move those two tasks. i felt my life have been connected to the king legacy and yet i felt that there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me. and how i got involved in this journey of editing kinks papers. >> host: it's an excellent read and you and i are of the same generation and i too was coming-of-age in the 60s. and the book i must say was bittersweet for me because i guess week because they knew dr. came. he was my mentor and i knew in the last two years of my life in bitter because of the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred in this country and i guess we can start at the beginning he caused at the beginning of your book you are run the mall with dr. came and ere the end of your book you are on the mall again 50 year
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 1:00pm EST
which dr. king could not resist, and lyndon johnson couldn't. they were constantly being pushed from below by people who wanted action. johnson becomes president on november 22, 1963. he is an accidental president. he had been in the backwaters of the vice-presidency. heed been drinking too much. he was fat. he was unhappy. he was cantankerous, and he was a forgotten man. martin luther king, on that day, faced a crisis of his own. the civil rights legislation that john f. kennedy finally introduced in june of '63, pushed by the demonstrations in birmingham, which revealed the police dogs dogs and the fire h. suddenly the government had to act. the first great accomplishment of lynn johnson son, that not much attention is given to, is the magnificent way he assumed the presidency. this was a nation in crisis. we had a cold war going on. in which the -- there was huge fear of russian missiles heading our way. our president had been killed. we didn't know whether it was the russians who had kill him or castro or -- it was great, great uncertainty. and johnson came to that job, reassured
LINKTV
Jan 21, 2013 3:00pm PST
, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political party, the celebration at the mead center for american theater paid tribute to the continuing struggle for peace and justice here in the united states and throughout the world. we begin with naacp president benjamin jealoin. >> this is the place to be tonight. the challenge for our country was never to see the day when a person of color would be president, know the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to happen again and again. we knew it could be condoleezza rice. it could be colin powell. but we got barack obama. we got a man who was a product of a progressive movement. as we stand her
CNN
Jan 21, 2013 5:00pm PST
ago, that dr. king stood on the steps of the lincoln memorial and said i have a dream. >> of course, this was actually the fourth time that president obama has taken the oath of office. let's bring in our panel, van jones, cnn contributor who served as president obama's green jobs adviser in 2009. sally quinn, margaret hoover, republican consultant, cornell belcher, democratic strategist who served fas a pollster for president obama's 2012 re-election team. i wonder how you think this anniversary, this martin luther king day, informed and was infused throughout president obama's remarks today. >> i'll go back to even when he was senator obama. he always talked about, he also understood the gravity and talked about, i stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil right era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because of you all, i am possible. and i remember we
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 10:30am EST
conversation with the desk clerk, really funny. i said is there a dr. king staying at the hotel? in spanish. he wants to try his english out on me. king? how do you say that in spanish? i said ray. he said i will do the spanish in english. [speaking spanish] >> for whom that is -- one time we had -- we never had a king. i said his name is king. you said dr. king. the doctor thing, forget the king. just look at the register. i had 480 more hotels to call -- maybe. and he looks at the register and it says kingo. he had to put an o on their somehow. i said really? yes. it is better in spanish. [speaking spanish] >> in spanish a black uncle and we say a black guy. so funny using the word in that context. his last words, running out the door, around the corner down to the castillo, almost like crossing the new jersey turnpike which is one of my other books, the new jersey turnpike and the native new yorker i am dodging traffic like crazy and get to the hotel and picked up the phone in the lobby and say will you connect me with his room and picks up the phone and says hello? he was exhausted. he had
MSNBC
Jan 20, 2013 9:30am PST
day. it's not just dr. king's birthday celebration, but it's also the 50th anniversary this year of his historic speech during the march on washington, the "i have a dream" speech. and since this president been elected, there is a memorial to dr. martin luther king jr. on the mall. it's not just abraham lincoln or washington or jefferson or roosevelt but also standing nearby martin luther king jr. and it says something for our nation that we're going to create a beloved community, we're going to create a society that is free of racism and bigotry and no one will be left out or left behind. doesn't matter whether you're black or white lashgs tino, asian-american, native american. it doesn't matter where you're straight or gay. dr. king legacy is saying that we are one people, we are one family, we are one house. we make up the american house, the american family. >> amen to that, representative john lewis. thanks for your time. >> thank you. >> in a moment, the big three on how president obama can bridge the political divide in washington. ♪ [ slap! ] [ male announcer ] your fav
CBS
Jan 21, 2013 1:30pm EST
the aura of dr. king today quite well. >> pelley: and this day being inauguration day and martin luther king day all at the same time. doug, thanks very much. cbs news live coverage of the inauguration of president obama will continue from washington in just a moment. [ male announcer ] nearly sixteen million people visit washington dc every year. some come to witness... some to be heard. we come to make an impact. to learn from leaders... and to lead others. to create... and create change. we are the george washington university... we come to make history. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. >> pelley: welcome back to cbs news
CBS
Jan 21, 2013 7:00am PST
'll come through the rotunda, walk by that bust of dr. martin luther king, jr., and then into statuary hall for a tradition that's the most exclusive lunch you can imagine. all of the nation's leaders, the president, the vice president, congressional leaders, supreme court justices, their spouses, they will all gather for a lunch to put politics aside for at least a brief moment. >> thank you very much, jan. >>> as we watch the president's motorcade approaching the capitol, let me give you a little bit of an advanced look on what you're seeing as the inauguration ceremonies proceed. as we mentioned, senator charles schumer of new york will be the master of ceremonies. he will have a short speech and then he will be introducing myrlie evers-williams, a former chair of the naacp and the widow of medgar evers. the naacp field secretary who was gunned down in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on t
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 10:00am EST
, congressman chaka fattah. >> thank you, mr. chairman. we are about to celebrate the life and legacy of dr. king and we are remooneded that on that balcony at the lorraine motel in memphis he was shot down. whether president reagan or president kennedy who were both shot, one killed and one almost fatally wounded, we are reminded here in washington all the time of the dangers of guns. that's why all of you went through the security protections to come into this building. and the supreme court that ruled that everyone has a right to bear arms also makes it clear you can't bring them into the supreme court. so -- that's because we actually know that guns are dangerous. and that -- as much as people may proclaim one thing, you have to look at the actions. on the floor of the house we saw members shot down once. that's why we have bulletproof things and other kinds of protections. mayor nutter is one who as someone growing up in west philadelphia, the best place in the world to grow up, as a former councilman and now as second term mayor of our city is in so many respects america's mayor now.
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)